Francisco Riquelme

Home All

Francisco Riquelme-Montecinos is an architecture and portrait photographer living in Toronto.
He has received multiple awards from the GTA photography academy.
In 2016 his work was part of the Contact Festival Nikon official gallery in Toronto
In 2018 he was awarded 1st place in the 50x50 photography exhibition in celebration of George Brown College’s 50 year anniversary. The exhibit gathered some of the best photographers of the city and was part of the 2018 Contact Festival in Toronto.
In 2019 he set up his portable studio at the Tyendinaga Pow Wow in Deseronto, Ontario, and worked on a series of in situ portraits of the dancers. Part of this work has been acquired by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Queen’s University and they are on display in their main Campus in Kingston, Ontario.
Given the impossibility of following up on his interest in portraits during the COVID pandemic he turned his photographic eye to Toronto’s architecture; specifically the city’s iconic variety stores. This project, called “Toronto 100 Variety”, portrays a group of 100 stores from within the city isolated from any other object or surroundings.
In his words:
“My approach is to separate them from any other specific element or context in order to capture the viewer's full attention to their style, details, and architectural presence. This particular way of portraying them was actually born out of the pandemic. As the city shut down we became little islands disconnected from one another. The same thing happened to the stores that had to continue navigating this new reality as lonely vessels in the middle of this social storm”
This project was featured online by Toronto Life Magazine in July, 2021.
In 2021 his work on the stores was awarded first place at the international Minimal Photography award, event that gathered more than 3000 photographers from 39 countries. The award was featured by many international media outlets including The Guardian in the UK.
Francisco’s life began in Chile as a criminal lawyer, then as a TV News anchorman. He then transitioned into a professional outdoor guide, taking clients on sea kayaking and hiking trips from as far north as Greenland and Baffin Island, to as far south as Patagonia. Now settled in Toronto, his focus has
transitioned yet again, to highlight the visible-invisible through his particular photographic style.

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

“My approach is to separate the stores from any other specific element or context in order to capture the viewer's full attention to their style, details, and architectural presence. This particular way of portraying them was actually born out of the pandemic. As the city shut down we became little islands disconnected from one another. The same thing happened to the stores that had to continue navigating this new reality as lonely vessels in the middle of this social storm”